Old New World: Hopi fresh corn stew

Hopi fresh corn stew topped with green chile sauce

My sweetheart is crazy about corn. As soon as it shows up at the farmers markets, we eat as much as we can: grilled and topped with lime and chile elote-style, baked in the husk with just a little salt, raw and mixed into cold salads. We roast and freeze the rest for winter use. This Hopi fresh corn stew was a big hit - my sweetheart even packed the leftovers for lunch the very next day, which is a rare thing indeed.

shucked corn cut off the cob

Hopi fresh corn stew 

makes 4 generous servings

  • 1 TBSP sunflower oil
  • 8 oz ground or finely chopped seitan (optional)
  • salt and pepper to taste (I used 1/8 tsp salt and a few grinds of pepper)
  • 2 ears of green or fresh yellow corn
  • 2 cups of summer squash (about 2 small round ones), cubed
  • 2 cups water or vegetable broth+ 2 TBSP water, divided
  • 1 TBSP cornmeal

Shuck the corn and cut the kernels off the ears. Heat oil in a pot over medium heat. If using seitan, brown for a few minutes and then stir in salt and pepper to taste. If not using seitan, add the corn and squash, stir, then the salt and pepper and stir again. Add  water, adding more if necessary to cover the vegetables, cover the pot and simmer for 30 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Add the 2 TBSP of water to the 1 TBSP of cornmeal and stir until smooth, then add to the stew and stir. Simmer uncovered 5 minutes and serve.

Hopi fresh corn stew simmering

notes

Green corn is traditionally used here; if you grow it or can find it, use it. Otherwise fresh yellow corn works nicely as a substitute. Cut the kernels off the cob into a large bowl by standing the ear on the pointed end in the bowl, holding the stem like a handle. I like to gather the husks at the stem end and twist them around it to make for an easier grip. Use long downstrokes. No muss, no fuss; be sure to watch your fingers.

Add other seasonal vegetables with similar cooking times if you like. 

Wheat is an Old World crop that was not brought to the New World until the early 16th century to what is now Mexico; seitan is obviously in no way authentic for a pre-colonial dish but I was curious as to how it would work as a meat substitute here. It added a nice savory taste and a hearty texture but I don't think the stew would suffer if it was left out. Be sure to use vegetable broth instead of water if you leave the seitan out, though, for a richer taste than water alone. Tempeh or pinto beans would also be nice if non-traditional additions. 

Top the stew with blue corn dumplings, green chile sauce, or both.

Recipe adapted from Hopi Cookery by Juanita Tiger Kavena. 

 

Hopi fresh corn stew topped with green chile sauce

Old New World: Mayan ts'anchak bi k'um and pim

ts'anchak bi k'um, pim and garnishes

Squash and their seeds were incredibly important to the Maya. Ground or crushed pumpkin seeds show up in drinks, soups, sauces and the rare treat. When my sweetheart surprised me with a pretty Delicata squash, I knew I wanted to make a typical Mayan dish with it. K'um is the basic word for "pumpkin" in Maya and ts'anchak means "boiled;" this is a very simple preparation that uses garnishes to build flavor and it is one that is still made today. Pim is still the word for "tortillas" in Yucatec Maya today, sometimes doubled as pimpim.

squash about to be boiled

ts'anchak bi k'um

makes about 8 cups

  • 4 pounds pumpkin or other winter squash
  • 10 cups water
  • salt to taste
  • 2 dried chili peppers
  • 1/4 cup pumpkin or squash seeds
  • 2 limes

Seed and cut the squash, peeling if necessary, into 2 inch pieces and place in a large pot with the water. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook until squash is tender, about an hour. Stir in salt. 

While the squash is simmering, toast your pumpkin or squash seeds until golden brown, then destem and toast your chili peppers, separately, in a heavy skillet (I use a small cast iron pan). Let cool, then chop the pumpkin seeds finely and set aside in a small bowl. Grind the chile peppers with a mortar and pestle or a molcajete  and set aside in separate small bowl. Quarter the limes when serving. Garnish the squash with the pumpkin seeds, chile peppers and lime or set out the small bowls of the garnishes along with the squash and pim.

 

pim 

makes 6

  • 1 cup masa harina
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup water plus more if necessary

Place the masa harina in a large bowl and stir in the salt. Add water and knead until the dough is firm but pliable. Form 6 balls of dough and cover them in the bowl with a damp  towel for 1 hour. 

Heat a flat pan over medium heat until drops of water dance and evaporate when flicked. Press between wax paper on a tortilla press or roll out into circles, then cook for about 2 minutes on each side. Fold stack of pim in a clean towel to steam for about 10 minutes.

 

notes

If you have a spice grinder, feel free to use it to grind the pumpkin seeds and the chile peppers. 

You can substitute 1 TBSP crushed chile pepper if you don't have access to whole dried chile peppers. 

If you also use a Delicata, you don't have to peel it - you can eat the skin! 

You can save the squash seeds to plant or to use in other recipes. 

Recipe from Mayan Cooking: Recipes from the Sun Kingdoms of Mexico by Cherry Hamman. 

ts'anchak bi k'um, pim and garnishes