Old New World: Inca chuchuqa

fresh shucked corn

There is not as large a library of food of the Inca as there is of food of the Aztec or Maya, at least not as has been translated into English that I could find - so I wound up getting a book in Spanish so I could read more about Inca foodways. My Spanish is unfortunately very rusty, so that means doing a quick scan through recipes is out of the question. That also means that by the time I have finished reading through a passage, it turns out I am trying to figure out how to make dried ground corn - which is much more of a project than a recipe! If you have a little bit of free time on your hands, perhaps you are up to it. I have typed out the instructions in both Spanish and my shaky English translation below. I won't tell you how long it took me to translate as it would just embarrass us all.

preparación para chuchuqa

  • maíz tierno o maíz seco

Desgranar el choclo (maíz tierno) o el maíz seco. Hervir los granos durante corto tiempo hasta que estén medio crudos. Algunos hierven el choclo en mazorca.

Extender los granos sobre que espacios cubiertos con paja o ichu durante varios días hasta que el grano se seque, se "chupe" hasta que llegue la mitad de su tamaño original.

Una vez seco, el maíz se muele no muy fino y se cierne para que elimine el afrecho.

 

dried corn; I did not dry this myself

how to prepare chuchuqa

  • sweet corn or dried corn

De-grain the sweet corn or dry corn. Boil the grains for a short time until they are medium raw. Some boil the corn on the cob. 

Spread the grains over areas covered with straw or bunches of grass for several days until the grain is dry and has "sucked" to half its original size.

Once dry the corn is ground very fine and any hanging bran is removed.

 notes

The quantities are up to you!

I assumed that "de-graining" the corn meant to simply remove it from the cob. This is incorrect! Desgranar is actually much more specific than I had thought, which makes sense. It refers to lifting out the kernels of corn from the cob by wiggling at the individual roots, one camino, or row, at a time.

I don't really know what the difference between maíz tierno o maíz seco or sweet corn and dry corn is - or why there would be the same instructions for both. Perhaps they are just synonyms?

I am also not sure why this particular kind of dried ground corn is not nixtamalized; when I look up chuchuqa or chochoca online most of the results I get refer to a kind of potato bread. However, it seems like some corn was simply secado al Sol: dried in the sun.

 

dried ground corn; I did not dry or grind this myself